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Understanding why some Muslim women wear a veil

I live in Tower Hamlets, the London borough with the largest proportion of Muslims in the UK. I see plenty of women every day who wear a veil of one kind or another. I don't have any kind of Muslim background so what could I do to start understanding why they wear what they do?

I went on a book hunt and luckily I found a book that gives a really clear background: "A Quiet Revolution" by Leila Ahmed. It's a book that describes some of the twentieth-century back-and-forth of different Islamic traditions, trends and politics, and how they relate to veils. The book has a great mix of historical overview and individual voices.

So, while of course there's lots I still don't understand, this book gives a really great grounding in what's going on with Muslim women, veils, and Western society. It's compulsory reading before launching into any naive feminist critique of Islam and/or veils. I'm sure feminists within Islam still have a lot to work out, and I don't know what the balance of "progress" is like there - please don't mistake me for thinking all is rosy. (There are some obvious headline issues, such as those countries which legally enforce veiling. I think to some Western eyes those headlines can obscure the fact that there are feminist conversations happening within Islam, and good luck to them.)

A couple of things that the book didn't cover, that I'd still like to know more about:

  1. The UK/London perspective. The book is written by an Egyptian-American so its Western chapters are all about things happening in North America. I'm sure there are connections but I'm sure there are big differences too. (I am told that Deobandi Islam is pertinent in the UK, not mentioned in the book.)
  2. The full-covering face veils, those ones that hide all of the face apart from the eyes. Ahmed's book focuses mainly on the hijab style promoted by Islamists such as the Muslim Brotherhood (see the photo for an example of the style), so we don't hear much about where those full face-coverings come from or what the women who wear them think.
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