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Why, if you're in a pub in Britain, and you don't want to get drunk, are you supposed to drink litres of sugar? Fizzy drinks are like that, but also so are the fruit-juice based things like J2O - waaaay sweeter than beer or wine. What should pubs serve? There are loads of options!

What strikes me is that the branded bottled options are of course the ones that get promotional effort, yet almost all pubs could easily set up with home made iced tea or home made apfleschorle with very little overhead.

food · Fri 19 October 2018

Inspired by this version

This is easy to make. The tricky thing thugh is "pulling" the jackfruit at the end of the cooking - it's a bit labourious but it makes a massive difference to the way the food tastes in the mouth afterwards. Please don't skip it! You could ask your guests to pull their own platefuls if that works.

Serves 3-4. (It keeps fine in the fridge and tastes good next day...)

Preheat a medium grill. Coat the jackfruit pieces in the three dried spices. Put them on kitchen foil on a baking tray, and put them under the grill for about 15 minutes, turning halfway through. This helps dry the jackfruit out.

Meanwhile, in a large deep pan, start the base of the stew: fry the diced onion (gently, don't let it burn at all) for about 5 minutes, then add the garlic and the chili. Stir. Let them fry for a minute or so before adding the mushrooms on top and stirring again. Optionally you can let this cook a bit more to get a touch of colour on the mushrooms, but either way, add the carrots, stir, and then add the shopped tomatoes, the red wine, and a splash of hot water (enough to loosen it to an ordinary stew thickness).

This is going to bubble for a good half hour, on a medium-low heat, with the lid on (take the lid off near the end if it needs to thicken up). You can start the rice cooking perhaps, if that's what'll be accompanying it.

Meanwhile, optionally you can griddle the red pepper to get some colour on it. Or just add it to the stew directly.

When there's about 5 minutes left, take the lid off the stew, and add the chocolate broken into pieces. Let it melt and then stir it through. It should make the stew thicken up and become more of a dark brown colour.

The main final thing you need to do is "pull" the jackfruit. With a pair of forks - ideally strong ones! - grab each piece of jackfruit one by one with a fork, and with the second fork rake at it to make it come apart into stringy pieces. (Don't do this in a non-stick pan, you'll ruin it with the forks.)

Chop the coriander roughly and mix it in to the stew just before you serve it.

Serve with rice, crusty bread, slices of lime... as you like.

recipes · Sat 08 September 2018

Aubergine makes a great simple vegetarian/vegan alternative to battered fish and chips. Cook it like this.

Serves 2. Takes 25 to 30 minutes.

And to serve:

Preheat the oven for the oven chips. (The aubergine will be going in too, later.)

Mix the flours and salt in a medium-sized bowl, and then start to pour the beer in, stirring with a fork to get everything combined and beat the lumps out. Try to use as little beer as possible to get the batter smooth - you want it to stay nice and thick so it'll form a thick coating.

Cut your aubergine(s) into big fillets. It'll depend on the size and shape of your aubergines, but for the medium-sized fattish ones I buy you can cut one in half lengthways and that gives two nice pieces, one for each person. But! You need nice big fillet-like pieces with both sides having flat white flesh exposed - so that the batter sticks better, and so that it's easier to fry. So if one side of a fillet is umblemished purple round skin, cut a thin slice off. You can discard that slice or you can keep it to batter+fry as scraps later.

Put the oven chips in the oven.

Heat a frying pan with a decent amount of oil for shallow-frying. Be a bit generous.

Dip the aubergine pieces in the batter, turning them around to coat them properly. Then immediately pop them into the hot oil.

Let them fry about 5 minutes on one side - don't move them around much, just let them fry to get a good coating. Just before you turn them over for the other side, take the leftover batter and pour a little bit on top of the aubergine, to replenish the raw batter on the uncooked side. Then you can turn the aubergine fillet over and fry the other side for 5 minutes.

When the aubergine fillets have fried to a nice golden crust on each side, take them out of the pan and put them on a baking tray, and pop them in the oven alongside the chips, to cook for another ten minutes. This will get the inside of the fillets nice and cooked and yielding.

During the last ten minutes, you can warm up the mushy peas or sort out whatever you want as accompaniment. You can also batter and fry those leftover pieces of aubergine. Or just fry some of the batter to make scraps.

Warning - the aubergine fillets retain heat really really well. Beware of burning your mouth when you tuck in to them!

recipes · Sun 26 August 2018

I seem to know more and more vegetarians. (The official stats say it's growing and growing in the UK, so it's no surprise.) Me too. And for some reason, I was wondering, what does everyone tend to eat, on an ordinary weekday evening meal? Although it's nice to share recipes and maybe even food photos, that's a completely different thing from the mid-week everyday cooking.

So what do people have on a normal Wednesday...? Well. I asked them all. This Wednesday. Here are the answers I got:

Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm niiiiiiiiiiiice. That all sounds lovely.

Have we learnt anything? Well, Quorn gets a decent showing (I notice that because I'm not into it myself), pops up 3 times versus halloumi's 2. At a rough guess, approx half of the meals rely on cheese. I kinda think I rely too much on cheese for veggie cookery. But there's a pretty good spread in the types of protein and the types of carbs people have in their meals. Anyway. It all sounds very nice.

food · Thu 23 August 2018

I'm really pleased about the selection presentations we have for our special session at ICEI2018 in Jena (Germany) 24th-28th September. The session is chaired by Jérôme Sueur and me, and is titled "Analysis of ecoacoustic recordings: detection, segmentation and classification".

Our session is special session S1.2 in the programme and here's a list of the accepted talks:

We also have poster presentations on related topics:

You can register for the conference here - early discount until 15th Sep. See you there!

science · Mon 20 August 2018

I've been trying out an e-ink reader for my academic work.

"e-ink" - these are greyscale LCD-like displays. You see the image by light reflectance, almost the same way you read a printed page, not by luminance like a TV/laptop screen. This should be better in lots of ways: better on your eyes, low-power, and you can read outside. The low-power comes because it doesn't need a full jolt of energy 50 times a second as does an LED display: if the image doesn't change, no power is needed, the image stays there for free.

Why for academic work? A LARGE portion of my everyday work consists of looking at academic article PDFs, scribbling on them, then giving/implementing feedback. This comes from students, collaborators, reviews for journals/conferences, and from editing my own work as I do it. Some people can do this kind of stuff directly on a laptop screen. I'm afraid I can't. It's less effective, less detailed when I do that - so, for years, I've been printing things out, scribbling notes on them, then throwing them away afterwards.

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If an e-ink reader can replace all that, maybe that's a good thing for the environment?

Note: it takes a lot of resources to build an e-reader. At what point is it "better" to print thousands of pages of paper, versus manufacture one e-reader? I don't know.

You can't use any old e-reader, for academic reviewing: it needs to be large enough to render an A4 PDF well (ideally, full A4 size), and needs some way of annotating. This one I'm trying has a stylus that you can use to scribble, and it works. Surprisingly good so far.

NOW THE NEXT STEP:

We sometimes have sunny days, you know. For some reason this often happens when we've a workshop or conference organised. "Why don't we have the session outside on the grass?" I'm tempted to say. The answer would be... because you can't really look at people's slideshow slides out on the grass. Pass a laptop around? Broadcast the slides to everyone's smartphones? Redraw everything from scratch on a flipchart? Meh.

What I'd like to see is an e-ink screen, large enough to host a seminar with. The resolution doesn't need to be as high as all that, certainly doesn't need to be as high as is needed for reviewing PDFs. it just needs to be big. It would be great if there was a stylus or some other way of scribbling on the screen too.

Most academic slides are not animated. So an e-ink type screen is much more suitable than an LED screen, and would use much much less power. (Ever noticed the amount of cooling needed for those LED advertising signs in the street? Crazy power consumption.)

IT · Thu 02 August 2018

This week we've been at the LVA-ICA 2018 conference, at the University of Surrey. A lot of papers presented on source separation. Here are some notes:

An interesting feature of the week was the "SiSEC" Signal Separation Evaluation Challenge. We saw posters of some of the methods used to separate musical recordings into their component stems, but even better, we were used as guinea-pigs, doing a quick listening test to see which methods we thought were giving the best results. In most SiSEC work this is evaluated using computational measures such as signal-to-distortion ratio (SDR), but there's quite a lot of dissatisfaction with these "objective" measures since there's plenty that they get wrong. At the end of LVA-ICA the organisers announced the results of the listening test: surprisingly or not, the results of the listening test had broadly a strong correlation with the SDR measures, though there were some tracks for which this didn't hold. More analysis of the data to come, apparently.

From our gang, my students Will and Delia presented their posters and both went really well. Here's the photographic evidence:

Also from our research group (though not working with me) Daniel Stoller presented a poster as well as a talk, getting plenty of interest for his deep learning methods for source separation preprint here.

science · Thu 05 July 2018

I've always thought fake meat was a bit silly. When I recently starting eating more veggy food I promised myself I wouldn't have to eat Quorn pieces, those fake chicken pieces that taste bland and (unlike chicken) don't respond to cooking. They don't caramelise, they don't get melty tender, they just warm up. If you like cooking, you're much better off cooking some actual veg.

So it's a shock to be saying that some of the best meals I've had in 2017 have been fake meat. It seems the veggie world is just stepping up and stepping up. I've been lucky enough to travel for work and here are some amazing things I ate (mostly paid from my own pocket, BTW):

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In Beijing, there was this braised fish dish, an extravagant centrepiece to a meal. A big pot of braised Chinese vegetables, and at the centre a mock fish steak. I don't know what it was made of but it had been slashed across the upper surface (like you would do with meat to get flavours in) and that upper surface was grilled and caramelised, while the lower part in the braising sauce was meltingly tender.

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In Sweden, I got off the train in Lund and within a few minutes my eyes lighted on a kebab shop (Lunda Kitchen) with a massive list of things labelled "vegan": burgers, kebabs, pepperoni pizzas... My host actually said that he thought "vegan" probably didn't mean the same thing as it did in English. Anyway it does. Their vegan doner kebab was just ace: just meaty and spicy enough, all the trimmings as usual.

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In Germany, I had this literally unbelievable vegan schnitzel (at Max Pett, Munich). It wasn't just that it had the taste of a breaded steak "Wiener art", but also the structure, the resistance and texture you expect when you cut into an actual schnitzel. The only reason I didn't grab the serving staff and double-check whether it was veggie or not was that I was in a very definitely vegan restaurant.

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In France the seitan bourgignon was a great idea but the execution wasn't ideal. However we had excellent seaweed "tartare" and artichoke "rillettes", both of which captured specific je-ne-sais-quoi tastes of the traditional dishes they were paying tribute to. These were in various Paris vegan bistros.


In India... I didn't have any fake meat at all. I had some amazing dishes, since they've a massive history of veggie cuisine of their own, but it doesn't centre around fake meat.

Back in London? Yes there's plenty of good food around, such as vegan doner kebab or cheezburger from "Vx". But... the veggie version of a roast beef Sunday lunch? I haven't seen it yet...

food · Tue 20 March 2018

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