Other things on this site...

MCLD
music
Evolutionary sound
Listen to Flat Four Internet Radio
Learn about
The Molecules of HIV
MCLD
software
Make Oddmusic!
Make oddmusic!

How I made a nice map handout from OpenStreetMap

OpenStreetMap is a nice community-edited map of everything - and you can grab their data at any time. So in theory it should be the ideal thing to choose when you want to make a little map for an open-source conference or something like that.

screenshot of map handout. click for PDF

For our event this year I made these nice map handouts. It took a while! Quite tricky for a first-timer. But they're nice pretty vector PDF maps, with my own custom fonts, colour choices etc.

For anyone who fancies having a go, here's what I did:

  1. I followed the TileMill "30 minute tutorial" to install and set up TileMill on my Ubuntu laptop. It takes longer than 30 minutes - it's still a little bit tricky and there's a bit of a wait while it downloads a lump of data too.
  2. I started a new map project based on the example. I wanted to tweak it a bit - they use a CSS-like stylesheet language ("MSS") to specify what maps are supposed to look like, and it's nice that you can edit the stylesheets and see the changes immediately. However, I found it tricky to work out what to edit to have the effect I wanted. Here's what I managed to do:

    • I changed the font choice to match the visual style of our website. That bit is easy - find where there are some fonts specified, and put your preferred font at the FRONT of all the lists.
    • I wanted to direct people to specific buildings, but the default style doesn't show building names. However, I noticed that it does show names for cemeteries... in labels.mss on line 306 there was

          #area_label[type='cemetery'][zoom>=10] {
      

      and I can add buildings to that:

          #area_label[type='building'][zoom>=10], 
          #area_label[type='cemetery'][zoom>=10] {
      
    • The underground train line was being painted on top of the buildings, which looks confusing and silly. To fix this I had to rearrange the layers listed in the Layers panel - drag the "buildings" layer higher up the list, above the "roads" ones.

    • When I'd got the map looking pretty good, I exported it as an SVG image.
    • Then I quit TileMill and started up Inkscape, a really nice vector graphics program. I load the SVG that I saved in the previous step.
    • I edited the image to highlight specific items:
    • The neatest way to do this is to select all and put it all into a layer, then select the items you want to highlight and move them to a new layer above. Once they're in a separate layer, it's easier to use Inkscape's selection tools to select all these items and perform tweaks like thickening the line-style or darkening the fill colour.
    • Selecting a "word" on the map is not so easy because each letter is a separate "object", and so is the shadow underneath. If there's a single word or street-name you're working on, it's handy to select all the letters and group them into a group (Ctrl+G), so you can treat them as a single unit.
    • You can also add extra annotations of your own, of course. I had to add tube-station icons manually, cos I couldn't find any way of getting TileMill to show those "point-of-interest"-type icons. I think there's supposed to be a way to do it, but I couldn't work it out.
    • The next job is to clip the map image - the map includes various objects trailing off to different distances, it's not a neat rectangle. In Inkscape you can do a neat clipping like this:
    • Select all the map objects. If you've been doing as I described you'll need to use "Select all in all layers" (Ctrl+Shift+A).
    • Group them together (Ctrl+G).
    • Now use the rectangle tool to draw a rectangle which matches the clipping area you want to use.
    • Select the two items - the rectangle and the map-item-group - then right-click and choose "Set clip". Inkscape unites the two objects, using the rectangle to create a clipped version of the other.
    • Now with your neatly-cropped rectangle map, you can draw things round the outside (e.g. put a title on).
    • If you ever need to edit inside the map, Inkscape has an option for that - right-click and choose "Enter group" and you go inside the group, where you can edit things without disturbing the neat clipping etc.
    • Once you're finished, you can export the final image as a PDF or suchlike.
| IT | Permalink

social