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New Ock

Finally! After quite a few months absence, I've uploaded a new episode of our radio/podcast show, The Ock Show:

www.flatfourradio.co.uk/

There are some mind-bending tracks in this episode, I just love them - check out the lyric in that "Anxious" by Patch for example... Direct MP3 link (20MB).

| radio |

Mixing It saved from oblivion - by Resonance FM!

Great news! As I mentioned before, one of the best programmes ever, "Mixing It", was dropped by the BBC this month, but it's been rescued - by Resonance FM!

Resonance FM just sent out an email saying that Mixing It will be going out starting Wednesday 28th Feb at 11pm - i.e. tomorrow. Tell everyone you know!

This is good news for a few reasons. Firstly it'll bring a little bit of new publicity for Resonance FM, which as I've said is pretty much the only place to look for good new weird music now that the BBC has lost John Peel and jettisoned Mixing It. Secondly it should prove to the dickhead in charge of Radio 3 that there is a significant audience for this kind of thing. Certainly it's not a mainstream audience, and not the same audience that is likely to listen to "Jazz Archive" (cor, that title makes me excited, how about you?), but it's a constituency, and one that the BBC should feel at least some obligation to provide for. After all it's the kind of people as featured on Mixing It that have consistently turned out to be the future of music in Britain and elsewhere, whether it's glitchtronica, plunderphonics, or illbient hip-hop... or all the other things without funky names.

The music scene in Britain is not purely built on Oasis and Franz Ferdinand. It's built on a strong foundation of innovation and exploration, fostered and promoted by people with excellent judgment such as John Peel, Mary-Anne Hobbs, and Robert and Mark from Mixing It. It's important.

| radio |

Open Country

Radio 4's Open Country is a really interesting programme, sonically. You never ever hear anything like it on radio - people having a conversation while puffing and panting as they take a stiff walk up some hill or across some island.

It makes it seem kind of odd that all the other radio programmes in the world are so static and sedentary. I wonder if any other radio formats would suit that kind of delivery, where people have a conversation while walking along? Perhaps those programmes that review films and plays could conduct their reviews just as the presenters emerge from the theatre and try and find the night bus to get them home. That would add a nice hint of realism, and an interesting background. Hmm...

| radio |

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