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My PhD research students

I'm lucky to be working with a great set of PhD students on a whole range of exciting topics about sound and computation. (We're based in C4DM and the Machine Listening Lab.) Let me give you a quick snapshot of what my students are up to!

I'm primary supervisor for Veronica and Pablo:

  • Veronica is working on deep learning techniques for jointly identifying the species and the time-location of bird sounds in audio recordings. A particular challenge is the relatively small amount of labelled data available for each species, which forces us to pay attention to how the network architecture can make best use of the data and the problem structure.

  • Pablo is using a mathematical framework called Gaussian processes as a new paradigm for automatic music transcription - the idea is that it can perform high-resolution transcription and source separation at the same time, while also making use of some sophisticated "priors" i.e. information about the structure of the problem domain. A big challenge here is how to scale it up to run over large datasets.

I'm joint-primary supervisor for Will and Delia:

  • Will is developing a general framework for analysing sounds and generating new sounds, combining subband/sinusoidal analysis with probabilistic generative modelling. The aim is that the same model can be used for sound types as diverse as footsteps, cymbals, dog barks...

  • Delia is working on source separation and audio enhancement, using a lightweight framework based on nonlocal median filtering, which works without the need for large training datasets or long computation times. The challenge is to adapt and configure this so it makes best use of the structure of the data that's implicitly there within an audio recording.

I'm secondary supervisor for Jiajie and Sophie:

  • Jiajie is studying how singers' pitch tuning is affected when they sing together. She has designed and conducted experiments with two or four singers, in which sometimes they can all hear each other, sometimes only one can hear the other, etc. Many singers or choir conductors have their own folk-theories about what affects people's tuning, but Jiajie's experiments are making scientific measurements of it.

  • Sophie is exploring how to enhance a sense of community (e.g. for a group of people living together in a housing estate) through technological interventions that provide a kind of mediated community awareness. Should inhabitants gather around the village square or around a Facebook group? Those aren't the only two ways!

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